Judge Helen shores lee tells how she turned civil rights Era experiences into a riveting book

Judge Helen Shores Lee, who authored a book about her life in Birmingham as a Civil Rights attorney's daughter, told Alabama Media Professionals members she was a defiant child who broke Birmingham's segregation rules. At the our regular monthly meeting in May, she revealed that she purposefully drank from the "whites only" fountain at Loveman's and even shot a gun at some white hooligan boys harassing her and her family.

When her father explained to her that shooting at people was possibly going to land her in jail, and he wouldn't be able to get her out, she decided that Birmingham's injustices were not going to be a good fit for her nature. Lee explained that her temperament was not one of nonviolence at that time. She was only 13 then. So, an opportunity took her to Los Angeles, and later her husband brought her back to Birmingham.

Judge Lee said she ended up being influenced by John Lewis . . . read more


Fun with Friends at the 35-Year AMP Reunion and Celebration

These former and current members were active in the early days of our organization, in the 1980s: Carolanne Roberts, Suzanne Dent, Beth Garfrerick, Ginger Harvill, Carolyn Stern, Virginia Gilbert Loftin, Mary Wimberley and Jane Newton Henry.

These former and current members were active in the early days of our organization, in the 1980s: Carolanne Roberts, Suzanne Dent, Beth Garfrerick, Ginger Harvill, Carolyn Stern, Virginia Gilbert Loftin, Mary Wimberley and Jane Newton Henry.

On April 18, our organization brought together former and current members at The Club in Birmingham to celebrate 35 years of our organization’s history and the 2015 AMP Contest Award winners.

Former member Suzanne Dent came from Atlanta while another former member, Beth Garfrerick, and some college students traveled down from Florence, Alabama to remember good times from the early days of our organization’s activities. The room was filled with laughter and smiles.

A total of 44 enjoyed watching a slideshow video, flipping through scrapbooks, visiting old friends . . . read more


Journalist Randall Pinkston spoke at Q&A session hosted by AMP

Thanks to the efforts of our VP of professional development, Donna Francavilla, our organization benefited from listening to stories of earlier news media days from well-known national reporter, Randall Pinkston. At a special March meeting, which included members of the Birmingham Black Journalists Association, Pinkston told about the struggles he experienced in discovering his unexpected career and his freelancing work today.

Pinkston ultimately climbed his way to being a White House Correspondent in CBS's Washington Bureau. He then became a general assignment reporter, contributing to CBS broadcasts, including "CBS Evening News," "CBS News Sunday Morning," and "48 Hours." Pinkston also contributed to the CBS Reports documentary, "Legacy of Shame" with Correspondent Dan Rather.

He’s currently a freelance correspondent at Al Jazeera Television. 

Just for fun, watch Randall’s last report for CBS.


AMP/BBRC/AMA Fall Workshop considered a success

The AMP/BBRC/AMA Fall Workshop was a success. The multi-track conference provided attendees many choices of skill-building sessions.

One attendee said he'd attended many conferences but this one was the best. He said he got enough from the first speaker to justify the cost of the conference.

Wade Kwon, of Y'all Connect talked about the collapse of the Birmingham media ecosystem. Ike Pigott, Consultant, Alabama Power talked about the Era of the Evaporating Newsroom, and the opportunities now available for freelancers.

Other topics covered included Using Twitter to Build Your Brand, Digital Automation, SCO, and an overview of the Innovation Depot & Birmingham’s Innovative ecosystem.

Stay tuned for future Alabama Media Professional’s workshops, you'll be glad you did.

Many attended our fall conference, finding helpful instruction and enjoying a day with their professional peers.